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Ten Myths About Immigration—Updated!

The Teaching Tolerance staff of the SPLC has updated their Ten Myths about Immigration to respond to the recent executive orders and proposed legislation to limit immigration and acceptance of refugees, educators and students.   The updated version of their popular “Ten Myths About Immigration” feature reflects current statistics and information so you and your students can dispel harmful stereotypes.

Take a minute to read through the article, learn why the statements are false and think about how to talk to students about the realities behind each myth.

How many of these myths have you heard?

      1. Most immigrants are here illegally.
      2. It’s easy to enter the country legally. My ancestors did; why can’t immigrants today?
      3. Today’s immigrants don’t want to learn English.
      4. Immigrants take good jobs from U.S. citizens.
      5. “The worst” people from other countries are coming to the United States and bringing crime and violence.
      6. Undocumented immigrants don’t pay taxes and burden the national economy.
      7. The United States is being overrun by immigrants like never before.
      8. We can stop undocumented immigrants coming to the United States by building a wall along the border with Mexico.
      9. Banning immigrants and refugees from majority-Muslim countries will protect the United States from terrorists.
      10. Refugees are not screened before entering the United States.
We hope that, with these facts at your fingertips, you’ll feel more confident leading constructive conversations about immigration and the role that immigrants play in shaping our history and identity as a country

Responding to Hate and Bias at School

The Southern Poverty Law Center’s Teaching Tolerance project, has developed a Guide for Responding to Hate and Bias at School. The guides is divided into three sections:
  • Before a Crisis Occurs. How can you and other school leaders assess your school’s climate with an eye toward defusing tension, preventing escalation and avoiding problems?
  • When There’s a Crisis. What are the nine key points to consider when responding to a crisis that has been triggered by a bias incident at your school?
  • After the Worst is Over. How can you address long-term planning and capacity building for the future, including development of social emotional skills?

New Healthy Montgomery Calendar

Healthy Montgomery has a new Community Calendar of Events.   You can find exercise classes, like Yoga and Tai Chi, nutritional education programs and smoking- cessation progams, and other healthy living programs on their website : Community Health Calendar. To submit an event that furthers the mission of Healthy Montgomery, contact Healthy Montgomery Find out what our community is doing to promote Healthier Living on our Resource Guide.

January is National Mentoring Month

January is National Mentoring Month. A mentor guarantees young people that there is someone who cares about them, assures them they are not alone in dealing with day-to-day challenges, and makes them feel like they matter. You can download the National Mentoring Partnership’s Toolkit, and view our Mentoring Resource Guide.   

October is National Bullying Prevention Month

October is National Bullying Prevention Month.  Whether you are a parent,  educator,  community member, teen, or kid, you can take a stand against bullying.   Visit the US Dept of Health and Human Service’s website, bullying.gov to find out who is at risk, and what you can do to prevent and respond to bullying. Check out these FAQ’s from the National Bullying Prevention Center Here, in Montgomery County, Project Change’s You Have the Power! program helps youth confront the serious problem of bullying head on with a youth-led mentoring program in which older students teach younger students about the characteristics and consequences of bullying and how to reduce it in their communities.
 ICC’s Crossroads Program provides counseling, mentoring, case management and positive youth development programming; .
 

July is Make a Difference to a Child Month

Children rely on mentors to help them grow and develop into strong, smart adults. The small action of a peer, teacher, parent, or other role model could make a big difference in the life of a child. All youth, including at-risk youth, special needs youth, pregnant/parenting teens, and children of incarcerated parents, could benefit from a mentor/buddy program offered through Montgomery County. Training sessions and volunteer opportunities are available. Programs aimed at supporting such youth include One-on-One and group mentoring programs, as well as advising  and tutoring programs. These services are available to Montgomery County children and young adults, and to those looking to be a youth mentor or program volunteer.

Contact Pathway to Services at 301-354-4908 for more information.


FYI-Programs in our Community                                                                  City of Rockville Mentoring Program: This program recruits volunteer mentors to meet weekly for one hour after school with elementary children in City of Rockville schools.   

July is Purposeful Parenting Month

Being a good parent means having the right tools and knowledge to care for and communicate with children. Parents of young children, teens, and young adults can easily access these tools and knowledge through parenting classes, seminars, and workshops. Numerous programs like these are offered to help parents and families work as a stronger unit and are available to parents, foster families, soon-to-be parents, and caregivers within Montgomery County.

Contact Montgomery County’s Childlink at 240-777-4769 for more information about parenting programs.


FYI-Programs in our Community

MCPS Parent Academy provides information to guide parents in helping their children succeed in school.

Ed Bohrer Parent Resource Center offers educational resources and tools to students of all ages, particularly including parents trying to obtain an education or improve their English speaking skills.

The Parent Encouragement Program (PEP) is a nonprofit that provides classes, events and other educational resources to parents and all who care for children, toddlers through teens.

P.E.A.C.E Program is specifically intended to provide families with separated or divorced parents with the skills to maintain family cooperation and continued parental support.

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